Social Media and the Outdoors: The Third World War

Dear Girls Across the Globe,
Let's stop body-shaming each other with hurtful comments about how another girl looks or doesn't look. We are all beautiful in our own unique way; so let's speak about each other with the dignity that we would want others to have when they speak about us.
” 
― Miya Yamanouchi, Embrace Your Sexual Self: A Practical Guide for Women

 Trying to get that perfect shot for the ‘gram =) But more importantly, I finally bought a real CAMERA. The Sony alpha 6000 is my new child. I cannot wait to share some of the photos I have taken with this camera! I plan on using this as my everyday camera in Africa and hoping to take some stellar safari shots.

Trying to get that perfect shot for the ‘gram =) But more importantly, I finally bought a real CAMERA. The Sony alpha 6000 is my new child. I cannot wait to share some of the photos I have taken with this camera! I plan on using this as my everyday camera in Africa and hoping to take some stellar safari shots.

Most of us can probably agree that social media is CRAZY. Filters, poses, rose colored glasses, the perfect outfits, hair and makeup just to post that perfect photo on the ‘gram and potentially risk falling off a cliff (too soon?) is a just a bit over the edge (no pun intended). Don’t get me wrong, I enjoy a good photo, a funny caption and an inspiring story and I have met some great people through social media but the amount of back and forth on whether or not social media is good for the outdoors seems to be a hot debate (just Googling “social media and the outdoors” brings up a plethora of well-written blogs and articles by some very well known magazines and outdoor authors). I have seen people get in fights on social media over this topic (keyboard warriors who fight behind screens) and I have read a lot of great and not so great articles on this topic and yes overcrowded trails do lead to destruction but I truly believe there is an underlying issue here that goes beyond the outdoors.

 One camp argues that social media is ruining the outdoors by overcrowding the trails, creating more human impact on Mother Nature, and advertising all the earth’s “secret spots” to the general public, thanks to geotagging (just the debate over geotagging makes my head spin). They also argue that SAR missions have drastically increased in the recent years due to social media (I believe there are many more factors involved other than social media).  The opposing camp argues that social media is a great way to bring the outdoor community together and there is a lot more encouragement to get outside (especially for the younger generations). Also, most people did not grow up hiking and camping so they use social media as a way to gain education and insight on how to prepare for the outdoors (guilty as charged, if you are reading this blog).

 This one is for the mean girls

I personally have witnessed a surge in crowds in the outdoors, especially in National Parks over the years and yes, I believe outdoor adventuring has become a marketing fad but I also believe in the healing power of Mother Nature and if more people are experiencing serenity in the outdoors instead of the hustle and bustle in urban everyday life, isn’t that a good thing? Are people getting outdoors to enjoy the healing power of nature or are people getting outside just for the ‘gram? To be honest, I really don’t care because there are much bigger issues at hand.

Social media has a disturbing impact on everyday life and it is affecting female self-esteem in a negative manner.

I still wonder to myself, “does the general public understand that social media accounts are curated profiles?” THIS IS NOT REAL LIFE PEOPLE!

 Haha told you these photos are curated!

Haha told you these photos are curated!

 And reviewed and edited…

And reviewed and edited…

I have had many girlfriends tell me they have become depressed by looking at social media accounts because they feel as though their lives are not worthy, they are not good enough, not pretty enough, not adventurous enough and they are missing out on all the fun. I know people who are so obsessed with Instagram to the point they only hike with people who have a certain number of followers (umm exclusive much?) Instagram is no longer “instant” posts but curated photos that could be days, months and years old that people are most likely posting while lying in bed at home. Let’s not forget the hair, makeup and fake poses that are often depicted on top of Half Dome. I was in Yosemite last summer camping with a group of gals who would take an hour to get ready because they had to put on fake eye lashes so they could look good in photos they were posting on social media (I ended up spending most of the weekend by myself because I do not want to be around anyone who wears fake eyelashes in the outdoors).

What happened to real women in the outdoors getting dirty on the trails, climbing rocks and not giving a damn if their hair is messy and they have sweat stains under their arms? As women, shouldn’t we be bonding on the trails, posing for silly photos, sharing stories and drinking wine? Or are we seriously getting into nature to just have a library of beautiful photos on Instagram so we can judge each other and compare our lives to a complete stranger?

I truly believe instead of debating whether social media is ruining the outdoors, we need to focus on what social media is doing to women and our society. We are tearing each other down, fat shaming girls we don’t even know, comparing ourselves to women who spent an hour putting on fake eyelashes and attacking each other for taking topless photos (do not even get me started on what I see in the mental health and eating disorder world of social media).

 Let’s get real on social, shall we?

Let’s talk about our mishaps in the outdoors, our embarrassing moments, why we have found healing in nature and let’s educate the general public (in a positive manner) why we choose to get outside.

No matter what you see on social media, remember you are beautiful, stop comparing yourself to another individual’s highlight reel, post that photo of you with boob sweat on the summit, and please do not allow other people to tear you down.

 Real life versus Instagram. I carry sheet masks with me when I camp, backpack and travel and I may or may not wear them in my tent, at camp or in the car.

Real life versus Instagram. I carry sheet masks with me when I camp, backpack and travel and I may or may not wear them in my tent, at camp or in the car.

 A super dirty, sweaty and happy selfie…

A super dirty, sweaty and happy selfie…

 Ehh… I am mildly obsessed with Smokey the Bear and I may have already been a bottle of Champagne in deep. Are my eyes open?

Ehh… I am mildly obsessed with Smokey the Bear and I may have already been a bottle of Champagne in deep. Are my eyes open?

 **For those of you wondering (and maybe even judging), YES I am on social media. I love using social media to connect with friends and family members and I find it incredibly useful for travel information, photography tips and it is a great way to stay in contact with people who I meet on the trails.  I also use social media as an avenue to share this blog as well as my Psychology Today Blog. Writing has been one of my passions since I was in grade school and I have learned to use my electronic pen and paper to share my thoughts, experiences, mistakes and lessons with others in hopes they can gain knowledge, self-esteem and maybe have a laugh or two. Do I deal with trolls and crazy people on social media? Yep, every damn day!**

Thanks for reading and see you on the trails,

Xx

Kristen

Hike Like a Girl: Periods and Peeing in the Backcountry

“You’re the reason I get up in the morning. That, and I need to pee.” 
― Darynda JonesSeventh Grave and No Body

 My recent 4th of July backpacking trip up to Cucamonga Peak to watch the fireworks. The sunset and sunrise were not that bad either. 

My recent 4th of July backpacking trip up to Cucamonga Peak to watch the fireworks. The sunset and sunrise were not that bad either. 

How to handle your period in the backcountry

If you spend a lot of time in the wilderness, you know first hand how annoying it is to be in the backcountry on your period. If you haven’t experienced this quite yet…just wait…it will happen. From menstrual cramps and mood swings to dealing with tampons and bloating, sometimes being female is rough but let’s be honest gals; guys could never do this on a monthly basis. We are so much stronger than we allow ourselves to believe. I personally have the most excruciating cramps that sometimes I vomit from the pain, literally cry and curl up in a ball. I have tried every natural remedy on the market but I still to the tried and true ibuprofen, which is sold under the brand name Advil or Motrin. Ibuprofen is a pain reliever with anti-inflammatory properties that specifically triggers prostaglandins. Prostaglandin triggers symptoms of pain associated with inflammation and are produced, in high concentrations by your uterine tissue during menstruation and are primarily responsible for menstrual cramps. Ibuprofen works by preventing your body from making prostaglandins, thereby reducing your menstrual cramps. It is recommended by physicians to take 800mg of ibuprofen 2-3 times a day for pain and to begin 2 days before your cycle in order to prevent cramping. 800mg is the recommended dose to treat any sort of pain caused by inflammation and I strongly recommend and prescribe this dose to all my patients (who do not have gastritis or ulcers).

Tampons, menstrual cups, and pads…oh my

I personally do not have a problem using tampons while I am backpacking or hiking however you must follow the Leave No Trace guidelines and remember to change your tampon every 4-6 hours. Contrary to popular belief, altitude alone should not really affect your period flow but some people do notice changes when they travel to higher or lower altitude areas more likely due to the stress of travel, crossing time zones, change in sleep cycles, etc.

Menstrual cups: an alternative to tampons and pads

They’re usually made of silicone or natural rubber and you can use for one for your entire trip and beyond. Some popular brands are DivaCup, Softcup, Lily Cup, The Keepers and Moon Cup. This reusable cup captures your menstrual flow, which means you need to insert it and later remove it to empty out its contents. You can usually wear a cup for up to 12 hours straight without emptying it, however, this depends on how heavy your flow is as many women say they do empty it every 4 hours for heavy cycles. These cups come in different sizes so it is recommended you try this product for a couple of cycles at home so you can get used to the fit and used to inserting/emptying the cup before you go out into the wild.

Before inserting or removing the cup, be sure to wash your hands with hand sanitizer or soap and water. Empty the contents of the cup and bury it just like you would any other human waste in a cat hole, which you should dig six to eight inches deep and 200 feet away from any water sources. If you are on a glacier or in a sensitive area where you need to use bags for human waste, instead of digging a cat hole, empty the contents of the cup into the waste bag. Then re-insert the cup and wash your hands again.

To clean your cup during the trip, wash it with warm water and oil-free soap if you can. You can also sterilize it in boiling hot water for 5-10 minutes. When cleaning your menstrual be sure to avoid using: vinegar, tea tree oil, scented/fragranced soap, castile/peppermint soap or any other oil based soap, rubbing alcohol, antibacterial soap, hand sanitizer, pre-moistened wipes, baking soda, hydrogen peroxide, dishwashing soap, bleach or harsh chemicals because these ingredients can slowly degrade the silicone and just imagine inserting hand sanitizer or rubbing alcohol up into your girl parts… no, thank you. The cup needs to be stored in something breathable, so once your cycle is over you can keep it in the cotton pouch that comes with many cups or in another cotton or paper bag.

Disposing of tampons and pads in the backcountry

  • You must pack out all of your waste, yes that means used pads and tampons.
  • Bring the kind of tampons without applicators for less waste to pack out.
  • Make sure to have one bag for clean tampons and another well-marked waste bag for used ones. 
  • Store used pads or tampons ones inside a separate duct-taped waste bag and add dry tea bags or crumbled aspirin to control the scent.
  • If you are in the bear country or in another area with wildlife issues, you will need to place this bag in the container holding your food and other scented items overnight so that you do have odors drawing wildlife towards your tent.
 Sitting on top of the world watching the sunset. 

Sitting on top of the world watching the sunset. 

Peeing in the backcountry: from squatting and pee rags to the Freshette and pee bottles

  •  If you’re on a slope, pee facing downhill so it flows away from you and not back down onto your feet.
  • If it’s windy, try to pee so it flows in the same direction as the wind so it doesn’t get blown back at you.
  • Squat low to the ground with your heels in front of your bum, so you do not risk peeing on your hiking boots.
  • Always wipe. Drip-drying over time can lead to urinary tract infections or yeast infections, and wiping after going pee makes a huge difference in preventing these illnesses.
  •  If you use toilet paper or baby wipes, please pack these out using a Ziplock bag (I double these baggies)

The power of the "pee rag" 

You can also use a “pee handkerchief” aka a bandana and tie it on the outside of your pack to dry in the sun. To those who may question whether a pee rag is sanitary, consider that ultra-violet rays from the sun are one of the earth’s most powerful disinfectants. A pee rag on the outside of a backpack is probably cleaner than the toilet paper rolls in many public bathrooms.

Squeeze bottles for the win

You can also use a high flow squeeze bottle to clean yourself after you are done by squeezing water into your girl parts (the high flow is really important). Note: These high flow bottles also work great for flushing out any wounds or lacerations you may get while on the trails.

Pee like a boy: The Freshette

If you do not want to mess with squatting on the trail, the Freshette feminine urinary director is also an option. (To be honest, I have never used this device nor does it interest me, but I have lots of gal pals who swear by it.

The infamous pee bottle

If you’re pinned down in a snowstorm, the last thing you want to do is go out into blinding wind and snow at night to drop your pants and pee. This is where the pee bottle comes in, and there are some special tricks for this one. First of all, make sure you get the largest pee bottle possible so that you don’t have to get out and empty it any more than necessary. I like using an extra-large collapsible Nalgene Cantene. Use a permanent marker to label the bottle (I typically mark a skull and crossbones on it) so it doesn’t get mixed up with your regular water bottles. No matter what, make sure it’s collapsible and has a wide mouth.

 My favorite trail companion and spirit animal, Moo. 

My favorite trail companion and spirit animal, Moo. 

Remember to always pack out what you pack in and do your business 200 feet from the trail and/or water source. 

Thanks for reading!

See you on the trails,

Xx

Kristen