Social Media and the Outdoors: The Third World War

Dear Girls Across the Globe,
Let's stop body-shaming each other with hurtful comments about how another girl looks or doesn't look. We are all beautiful in our own unique way; so let's speak about each other with the dignity that we would want others to have when they speak about us.
” 
― Miya Yamanouchi, Embrace Your Sexual Self: A Practical Guide for Women

 Trying to get that perfect shot for the ‘gram =) But more importantly, I finally bought a real CAMERA. The Sony alpha 6000 is my new child. I cannot wait to share some of the photos I have taken with this camera! I plan on using this as my everyday camera in Africa and hoping to take some stellar safari shots.

Trying to get that perfect shot for the ‘gram =) But more importantly, I finally bought a real CAMERA. The Sony alpha 6000 is my new child. I cannot wait to share some of the photos I have taken with this camera! I plan on using this as my everyday camera in Africa and hoping to take some stellar safari shots.

Most of us can probably agree that social media is CRAZY. Filters, poses, rose colored glasses, the perfect outfits, hair and makeup just to post that perfect photo on the ‘gram and potentially risk falling off a cliff (too soon?) is a just a bit over the edge (no pun intended). Don’t get me wrong, I enjoy a good photo, a funny caption and an inspiring story and I have met some great people through social media but the amount of back and forth on whether or not social media is good for the outdoors seems to be a hot debate (just Googling “social media and the outdoors” brings up a plethora of well-written blogs and articles by some very well known magazines and outdoor authors). I have seen people get in fights on social media over this topic (keyboard warriors who fight behind screens) and I have read a lot of great and not so great articles on this topic and yes overcrowded trails do lead to destruction but I truly believe there is an underlying issue here that goes beyond the outdoors.

 One camp argues that social media is ruining the outdoors by overcrowding the trails, creating more human impact on Mother Nature, and advertising all the earth’s “secret spots” to the general public, thanks to geotagging (just the debate over geotagging makes my head spin). They also argue that SAR missions have drastically increased in the recent years due to social media (I believe there are many more factors involved other than social media).  The opposing camp argues that social media is a great way to bring the outdoor community together and there is a lot more encouragement to get outside (especially for the younger generations). Also, most people did not grow up hiking and camping so they use social media as a way to gain education and insight on how to prepare for the outdoors (guilty as charged, if you are reading this blog).

 This one is for the mean girls

I personally have witnessed a surge in crowds in the outdoors, especially in National Parks over the years and yes, I believe outdoor adventuring has become a marketing fad but I also believe in the healing power of Mother Nature and if more people are experiencing serenity in the outdoors instead of the hustle and bustle in urban everyday life, isn’t that a good thing? Are people getting outdoors to enjoy the healing power of nature or are people getting outside just for the ‘gram? To be honest, I really don’t care because there are much bigger issues at hand.

Social media has a disturbing impact on everyday life and it is affecting female self-esteem in a negative manner.

I still wonder to myself, “does the general public understand that social media accounts are curated profiles?” THIS IS NOT REAL LIFE PEOPLE!

 Haha told you these photos are curated!

Haha told you these photos are curated!

 And reviewed and edited…

And reviewed and edited…

I have had many girlfriends tell me they have become depressed by looking at social media accounts because they feel as though their lives are not worthy, they are not good enough, not pretty enough, not adventurous enough and they are missing out on all the fun. I know people who are so obsessed with Instagram to the point they only hike with people who have a certain number of followers (umm exclusive much?) Instagram is no longer “instant” posts but curated photos that could be days, months and years old that people are most likely posting while lying in bed at home. Let’s not forget the hair, makeup and fake poses that are often depicted on top of Half Dome. I was in Yosemite last summer camping with a group of gals who would take an hour to get ready because they had to put on fake eye lashes so they could look good in photos they were posting on social media (I ended up spending most of the weekend by myself because I do not want to be around anyone who wears fake eyelashes in the outdoors).

What happened to real women in the outdoors getting dirty on the trails, climbing rocks and not giving a damn if their hair is messy and they have sweat stains under their arms? As women, shouldn’t we be bonding on the trails, posing for silly photos, sharing stories and drinking wine? Or are we seriously getting into nature to just have a library of beautiful photos on Instagram so we can judge each other and compare our lives to a complete stranger?

I truly believe instead of debating whether social media is ruining the outdoors, we need to focus on what social media is doing to women and our society. We are tearing each other down, fat shaming girls we don’t even know, comparing ourselves to women who spent an hour putting on fake eyelashes and attacking each other for taking topless photos (do not even get me started on what I see in the mental health and eating disorder world of social media).

 Let’s get real on social, shall we?

Let’s talk about our mishaps in the outdoors, our embarrassing moments, why we have found healing in nature and let’s educate the general public (in a positive manner) why we choose to get outside.

No matter what you see on social media, remember you are beautiful, stop comparing yourself to another individual’s highlight reel, post that photo of you with boob sweat on the summit, and please do not allow other people to tear you down.

 Real life versus Instagram. I carry sheet masks with me when I camp, backpack and travel and I may or may not wear them in my tent, at camp or in the car.

Real life versus Instagram. I carry sheet masks with me when I camp, backpack and travel and I may or may not wear them in my tent, at camp or in the car.

 A super dirty, sweaty and happy selfie…

A super dirty, sweaty and happy selfie…

 Ehh… I am mildly obsessed with Smokey the Bear and I may have already been a bottle of Champagne in deep. Are my eyes open?

Ehh… I am mildly obsessed with Smokey the Bear and I may have already been a bottle of Champagne in deep. Are my eyes open?

 **For those of you wondering (and maybe even judging), YES I am on social media. I love using social media to connect with friends and family members and I find it incredibly useful for travel information, photography tips and it is a great way to stay in contact with people who I meet on the trails.  I also use social media as an avenue to share this blog as well as my Psychology Today Blog. Writing has been one of my passions since I was in grade school and I have learned to use my electronic pen and paper to share my thoughts, experiences, mistakes and lessons with others in hopes they can gain knowledge, self-esteem and maybe have a laugh or two. Do I deal with trolls and crazy people on social media? Yep, every damn day!**

Thanks for reading and see you on the trails,

Xx

Kristen

Chafing the Dream: Best Kept Secrets to Prevent Chafing on the Trails

“After tens of thousands of years of evolution, how has mankind got to point where thigh-chafe is still a thing?”

IMG-6886.JPG

Take clothing with seams, add body parts of any size or shape, a backpack shoulder harness and hip belt, heat, humidity, constant movement and what do you have? Chafing. Active women know all about this and I am here to share all the tips and tricks to prevent this nasty irritation.

The where what and why of chafing

Chafing is an irritation to the skin caused by friction, usually skin-on-skin or clothing-on-skin. This friction will eventually cause enough irritation that it will injure your skin, resulting in a rash, blisters or raw skin. Severe chafing can be extremely painful, making movement difficult.

Chafing commonly occurs in body areas that are in constant motion so think under the arms, on the inner thighs, between our butt cheeks, on our nipples, on our feet, and in the groin area; basically, all the areas that make anyone uncomfortable to talk about.

As women, we naturally have more body fat than men so it is no surprise that the skin on our nipples and between our buns is often irritated and so many of us are embarrassed to talk about it. I mean seriously, I have had blisters from chafing in areas that I didn’t even know existed (I will spare you the details but so many of us have been there).

How to Prevent Chafing

  • Check for fit. Make sure your clothing and pack are the right sizes. If you chafe at a certain strapline, it could be because your shirt is too baggy or your pack doesn't fit. If adjusting the fit doesn't work, add padding, such as foam pieces, to your shoulder straps.
  • Wear synthetic fabrics. Clothing that wicks moisture away from the skin significantly reduces chafing. If your inner thighs chafe, try wearing spandex bicycle tights. Don a pair of hiking shorts over the spandex if you're shy.
  • Lube yourself up. If you chafe in a particular place, slather on a lubricant such as petroleum jelly before the rubbing starts. Think in between your skin folds, in between your toes, on the bottom of your feet, under your armpits, between you inner thighs and don't forget your bum and groin area.Keep the lube tube handy while you're hiking so you can reapply at the first sign of a hot spot. I literally lube my feet and many other body parts before every hike. In fact, I carry a small container of petroleum jelly in my first aid kit.
  • Wipe your bum. Again, nobody wants to talk about this but it’s real. Dried excrement can be a nasty skin irritant, especially when it’s mixed with your perspiration and constant friction. Yuck! Prevention is key and baby wipes come in handy quite often here. Remember to always pack out your toilet paper and wipes.
  • Keep your body clean. Keeping your body clean is one of the best things you can do on the trail to avoid chafing. The salt in your sweat, which rubs against your skin, often causes chafing. For obvious reasons, washing on a regular basis helps prevent this. Focus on vulnerable body parts, such as armpits, butt, and crotch.
IMG-6888.JPG

Popular anti-chafing creams

Vaseline petroleum jelly

Generic brand Petroleum jelly (the cheapest option)

Squirrels Nut Butter

Bodyglide

Gold Bond Friction Defense

ChafeZone Chub Rub

Underwear

  • The most important way to prevent butt and thigh chafing is to wear synthetic underwear; compression shorts, or lined running shorts that will not absorb moisture. This means NO COTTON underwear. Cotton absorbs your sweat when you hike and sticks to your skin. The seams of cotton underwear will then scrunch up between your thighs and rub your skin raw.
  • Keep your thong underwear at home
  • I swear by Patagonia Barely Hipster
  • I have also heard from many outdoor women that ExOfficio makes great underwear as well.
IMG-6887.JPG

Finding the perfect sports bra

  • Chafing: Make sure there is no chafing around the armholes, shoulder straps or seams. If the bra has hooks or snaps, make sure those don't chafe, either.
  • Straps: You should be able to fit two fingers between the straps and your shoulders. It’s vital that the straps are secure and comfortable. If they’re too tight, they will dig in. If they’re too loose, they will not provide the correct amount of support and will move around or slip off your shoulders.
  • Band: Raise your hands over your head. If the band rides up, it may be too big. Try adjusting the straps or back closure. If that doesn’t work, try a smaller band size.
  • Cup: Your breasts should be centered and fully contained in the cups. Scoop them in and center them. Wrinkles or puckers in the fabric indicate the cup is too big. If breast tissue is pressed outside of the bra, that means the cup is too small, or that the style of bra is the wrong cut for your breast type.
  • Support: Test the bra's support by jumping or running in place. Your breasts should feel secure and supported. If there’s too much movement up and down or side to side, keep looking for a better-fitting bra.

I am not well endowed (34 B) so although these are my favorite sports bras, I truly believe everyone should get fitted according to the above guidelines before making this purchase.

Patagonia Barely Bra

Athleta Fully Focus Bra

Brooks

Under Armour Mid Crossback Sports Bra

Moving Comfort Luna Sports Bra

Shorts vs. Pants

I personally experience chafing when I wear shorts for long distances (10 miles or more) even if the shorts are made from synthetic material. The seams rub up against my inner thighs which causes irritation so if I am running or hiking over 10 miles, I prefer to wear pants. I have heard many other ladies share this same experience so my rule of thumb is, if you are chafing between your inner thighs and are wearing shorts; switch to pants.

How to treat chafing

Clean the affected area with water and antibacterial soap

Apply ointments over the affected area.  Zinc oxide cream, coconut oil and Vaseline work quite well for this purpose.

Do you have any chafing stories or tips to prevent or treat chafing? I would love to hear them

Thanks for reading and see you on the trails

xx

Kristen 

Keeping it Beautiful in the Wild: Best Sweat Proof Makeup on the Trails

“Makeup is not a mask that covers up your beauty; it's a weapon that helps you express who you are from the inside” -Michelle Phan

 My gal pal Shannon and I on a sunset hike in Laguna Beach 

My gal pal Shannon and I on a sunset hike in Laguna Beach 

Nothing like taking a photo on the trails to only realize your mascara is no longer on your lashes but is a now smudged under your eyes to make it look like you literally rolled out of bed after sleeping in your makeup or to discover that blotchy foundation pattern on your face matches the foundation sweat stains on your shirt. Yikes. The reality of wearing makeup in the outdoors can be a beauty nightmare. I am not a big fan of wearing makeup in the outdoors, but being active and staying beautiful while in the wild is totally possible, with the right products.

 Sweat cosmetics was designed for active beautiful women by active beautiful women. 

Sweat cosmetics was designed for active beautiful women by active beautiful women. 

Makeup brands and products that you won’t sweat off

Sweat cosmetics is a high-performance makeup line that is designed to enhance and protect beauty for active women. These products are sweat-resistant, all natural and have been tested by Olympic athletes. From mineral foundations to mineral bronzers and powders, this active brand encourages women to get their sweat on.

Supergood Mineral Invincible Setting Powder with SPF sweat resistant, SPF mineral powder that mattifies shine and sets makeup

Wunderbrow eyebrow gel smudge proof, waterproof and stays up to 3 days

Philosophy Hope in a Jar sweat proof concealer to hide those under-eye circles and fine lines

Tinted physical barrier sunscreens

 Philosophy makes a great makeup and skin care line that outlasts Mother Nature and her elements. 

Philosophy makes a great makeup and skin care line that outlasts Mother Nature and her elements. 

 SkinMedica makes some of the best sunscreen both tinted and non-tinted that have age-defying properties as well as broad spectrum SPF protection. 

SkinMedica makes some of the best sunscreen both tinted and non-tinted that have age-defying properties as well as broad spectrum SPF protection. 

 Elta MD is another one of my favorite skincare lines. 

Elta MD is another one of my favorite skincare lines. 

Tinted sunscreens provide enough coverage to hide your blemishes while giving you a blended complexion. You can re-apply every two hours without worrying about smudging and uneven blending. The two main ingredients in physical barrier sunscreen, commonly referred to as sunblock, are zinc oxide and titanium dioxide. Physical barrier sunscreen works by sitting on top of your skin and deflecting the sun’s rays. They work instantly but can also be rubbed off easily and therefore should be re-applied frequently. Physical barrier sunscreens should ALWAYS be used if you plan on being outdoors in the sun. Check out my blog post on sun protection for more about sunscreens

Philosophy renewed hope in a jar skin tint

Elta MD broad-spectrum SPF 44

MD Solar Sciences mineral tinted creme

SkinMedica Total defense + Repair broad spectrum sunscreen SPF 34 (tinted)

Waterproof mascara that won’t rub off when you sweat

image_123986672 (44).JPG
IMG_5727.PNG

Lip colors for the trails

Lipsticks and lip-glosses look great in the outdoors but have you ever tried to re-apply lipstick without a mirror? You may or may not look like a clown afterwards, not to mention your water bottle spout will probably be covered in hot red or a shade of pink. I personally prefer tinted lip balm because you don’t have to worry too much about adding to your lip line when re-applying.

Burt’s Bees tinted lip balm

What’s your favorite makeup to wear in the wild? I would love to know.

Thanks for reading and see you on the trails

xx

Kristen

image_123986672 (45).JPG
image_123986672 (38).JPG